Amtrak, Ferries and Wild Women of the Pacific Northwest, Part 2

 20140522_112945   Susan, thank you for the wonderful email.  It was a glorious time with everyone….   I loved all our crazy, wacky, peaceful, sleepy, sugar coma, Star Light theater moments and the cool weather.   I miss you all terribly as I am back in hot old Idaho….  I had a great drive to Wenatchee with Pat, excellent conversation, saw gorgeous mountains, a wild river, ate the best ever Indian food, got a terrific tour from Pat and Bill of the charming downtown and panoramic view of the city.  

I logged into my WordPress site and noted I had already started a draft blog chronicling my recent adventures.  The beginning here  is part of an email response I wrote to Port Townsend Susan.  I decided to back up a bit to write more on this trip.–

The Amtrak ride ended too soon, for me anyway as a person who rarely rides the trains. However, from the snippets of conversations on board, Amtrak was a way of travel life for many commuting between Portland, Seattle and beyond.

I got off the train at Edmonds, WA, walked the short route to the ferry and crossed-over to Kingston, where my dear friend Nancy offered curbside service, and off we went to begin the last visiting section of my trip. A reunion with the women of the Pacific Northwest whom I had bonded with on our Habitat build in Kauai.

Thursday morning began with work on a Habitat for Humanity home in Chimicum, Washington.

Nancy is working!

Nancy is working!

20140522_113349

Ann, Kate (and guy in the background) are working!

Well, Nancy, Ann and Kate were productive. I got an attack of the lazy and dabbed slowly away on the exterior side, strolled around the lovely meadow and visited with others. Project Manager Kate noted the lackluster energy and graciously allowed an exit from work to go have fun in Port Townsend.

 

I am wandering, lollygagging around in the meadow  - not working.

I am wandering, lollygagging around in the meadow – not working.

Living in a state that has an abundance of sun and hot weather, I tried to temper my exuberant hope for rainy weather, as I realized I was surrounded by Pacific Northwest dwellers who cherish every ray of sunshine that graces their cloudy, moist world.

I have resided the last 37 years in the desert land of Boise, Idaho, which is a complicated place to live. Idaho is a diverse landscape of deserts, plains, wild rivers, gorges, stunning mountains and four distinct climate seasons. In fact on the plane ride to Portland, my seatmate was a longtime resident of Idaho and we spent the trip discussing the endless list of outdoor places to enjoy in Idaho and I felt a new gratitude for where I live. Yet, it is easy to feel landlocked in Boise particularly during the brutal summer heat. What I luxuriate in each time I flee to Port Townsend, Chimicum, or any location on the Oregon, Washington coast,  is the immediate proximity of the water, the lush greenery and mountain landscape. Eventually I will relocate and settle to the Pacific Northwest.

Meanwhile, back to the Wild Women of the Pacific Northwest HFH reunion.

A mixture of whirlwind activity began as we ate tasty clam chowder, pastries, drank delicious fresh roasted coffee, and strolled through the Saturday market. One of the highlights of the trip occurred when we went to the Rose Theater and watched a movie in the Starlight room. Located in an old building on the top floor, the theater consists of a collection of comfy chairs and couches. Movie time began with the heavy velvet curtains drawn over the windows, and introduced by one of the theater staff.  It was hard to decide which chair to sit in. I started the afternoon sitting with my friends, but halfway through the show, migrated back to a big, fluffy comfy chair. Tables are placed strategically around the furniture for moviegoers to eat dinner and some of the best popcorn this side of the Mississippi.

Wild Pacific Northwest Women (Susan L. is taking the photo)

Wild Pacific Northwest Women (Susan L. is taking the photo)

 

To be continued…..

 

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