Habitat for Humanity Taos, New Mexico

Adobe House in Progress

Adobe House in Progress

New Habitat adventure to Taos, New Mexico.

Smooth flights, easy connections and a variety of unusual airport conversations were the order of the day as I traveled Friday to arrive in Santa Fe, New Mexico. There I joined with some of my favorite Habitat for Humanity buddies.

They team has already been in Taos for a week building, and the weekend of October 25 is a rest and relaxation break.  Excellent timing on my part!

We spent a lovely Saturday walking through the local farmers market, visiting the abundance of artist galleries in Santa Fe, and marveling over the glorious, colorful fall weather. I stuffed myself with green chilies and flavorful salsa throughout the day wishing I could transport the homemade spicy delights home. Though I am bringing home a delicious jar of raspberry red chile ginger jam.   I ate the best Chile Rellenos last night for dinner and am still feeling the fire in my belly!

This afternoon we check out of our hotel and head down the road to Taos, and plan to stop for photo opportunities in this extraordinary landscape.  Monday the work begins for me and I look forward to building with this eclectic group of friends.

Best Team Ever!

Best Team Ever!

 

Leaving Snowgoose Way

98565909-01-altI bought a house in Meridian, Idaho five years ago, 2009 – rather a risky time to buy a home as the trajectory of the economy continued to descend. It was an out of character move that confounded many of my friends.  Not only for the location, but for the three car garage that was an astounding acquisition.  At approximately 825 square feet, it could easily be an apartment.

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Before I painted the walls.

Nonetheless, I stubbornly forged ahead, established a five-year plan to stay in the house, practice my handywoman skills, hope for an improved economy, and then sell.  I planned to use the money from the sale to buy a small cottage on the Washington coast.

As the economic downturn continued into a recession, near depression status, and the housing market bottomed out lower than expected, my five years turned to a ten-year plan. At times I wondered if I would ever get out of the house, perhaps stuck for a long time, and simply hoped to break even.

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Yes, I painted the wall blue!

However, surprisingly, at the five-year mark an improved, robust market began to emerge.  I was ready to sell and live in something smaller with less maintenance.  I wanted to use my time and money to travel, spend time with friends and family.

The process began with clearing everything out of the house to refurbish it with fresh paint and carpet.  Potential buyers could see the house clean and empty. Part of the task list involved finding a  home for ten-year old Miss Cleo cat, a stressful and sad situation that thankfully ended well.  After that ordeal, I vowed at some point in time to either foster older cats or try to take them on as pets.

During my five years on Snowgoose Way, I packed the time with people and new activities. One daughter lived with me for a couple of years, and the other came and went as she finished college.   Snowgoose saw several friends come and go as they transitioned to new lives. I hosted parties, and had family dinners over the holidays. My older daughter brought friends from college one summer, and they practiced acroyoga yoga in the yard.30843_10150201499000557_7159893_n

Locally I joined a community garden group that started behind the back of a church, and later moved to a large plot in Kleiner Park.  I learned how to grow food and enjoyed eating freshly picked cantaloupe, tomatoes, peppers, kale, red potatoes.  The first year I spent hours in the garden.  After work, I headed to Kleiner park to water and weed in the hot evening summer air.  Each night the broad horizon graced the sky with extraordinary shows of spectacular sunsets.

I had dreams of playing the piano again and for the first year practiced each day for at least 20 minutes, but that discipline fell by the wayside.  Instead, at a friend’s urging, I rekindle a long time dream of learning to play the banjo. The house endured endless hours of practice.

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Returned to a lovely beige color.

I remained in the house during the painting so I could attend to yard projects.  Daily I would arrive home and find walls that I had painted with my unique colors turned to lovely neutral beige.  Gradually I felt my personality leave the house. A good friend suggested I spend solitary time in the house to say goodbye, and while I smiled at the suggestion, inwardly I scoffed.  It turned out she was right.   Alone in a quiet house, I paused to enjoy the empty, simple, clutter free existence, honor the memories, and gave thanks for five years of beautiful shelter.

To PhD or not to PhD, Part 2 – Onward with Life!

DSC_0602nal banjoTo PhD or not to PhD, Part 2 –  continued from Part 1:

The mystical irony was in the timing that I received the no go PhD news. Relaxed from a Cascade, Idaho cabin retreat with my inspirational women friends, I immediately spotted the letter on the kitchen  table.  The weekend was rich with soul-searching conversations, vision boards, dream exploration, laughter, delicious food, and plenty of opportunity to snooze.   I tore into the envelope ready to accept my next challenge in life.

“Dear Ms Emerson – I regret to inform you that your admission to the PhD in Public Policy and Administration, State and Local Government has been denied.”

My fall higher education plans completely derailed, and mixed emotions swirled in a recipe of bruised ego, anger, and disappointment.  Then I felt embarrassed because for over a year, I talked incessantly to friends and family about my PhD plans. Next, a simple, subdued  thought, “Now what do I do. Reapply next year or apply to other universities?”   Finally, a curious feeling emerged  – relief.

Then the big question, do I want a PhD  and why? I know I can achieve that goal, but is that how I want to spend my time. Lack of a PhD does not prevent active involvement in affordable housing advocacy.

Since that March 2014 spring day when I opened the “No” letter, my life rapidly changed. Fall 2013, I had received a promotion into a new job as a Proposal Development Specialist with the Research Computing department. As a result, the rest of my spring 2014 melted into a flurry of travel to trainings and conferences that revitalized my talents and put my MPA to use.

I went on a glorious trip to the Washington Olympic peninsula, camped out, took long walks on foggy beaches, and explored the rain forest. I visited my daughter in Portland, Oregon and we shared an incredible weekend in Cannon Beach. My other daughter returned from New Zealand with loads of stories and pictures.

I decided to downsize, simplify, and sell my house, move into a smaller apartment and use precious time and money to travel, visit friends, and write. Instead of mowing the lawn or home maintenance projects, I plan to devote time playing the banjo, going to bluegrass festivals, writer workshops, and blogging conferences.

My PhD plotting plans did not leave a void for long. Other opportunities rushed in to seize the moment. As the gorgeous, cooling fall weather eases into the Treasure Valley, I am able to pause, thoroughly enjoy the transition, and not worry about getting an assignment completed, or that next paper written.

In October, I travel to Taos, New Mexico to join friends for one week to work on Habitat for Humanity build. I became involved with Boise Valley Habitat in 1994, when hired into a support staff position. After the position had ended, I remained involved with the organization locally, national and internationally. In addition to local builds, I joined Global Village teams in Northern Ireland, Romania, Guatemala, Hawaii, and a Jimmy Carter build in Valdosta, Georgia.
I look forward to additional volunteer opportunities and a chance to spend time with friends as result of my long involvement. Onward with an adventurous life!

photo (13)photo (10) (1)I look forward to additional volunteer opportunities and a chance to spend time with friends as result of my long involvement. Onward now with an adventurous life!

Chronicles of Downsizing

Stuff Quizzer Spirit

20140731_195039I finally decided to commit to selling my house at Snow Goose Way.  Lest you worry, I want to clarify the house you see pictured on the top of this blog is my future coastal dream house. Snow Goose is in Meridian, Idaho.

Each day after work, three or four boxes of items got packed, labeled and hauled out to the garage.  Through the month-long process, without fail, sometime around 2 am or 3 am in the morning the stuff quizzer spirit poked at my sleepy mind.

“Hey, sorry to bother you so early, but I noted the following items.  You packed three boxes of greetings cards. Granted you took five boxes of cards and correspondence, sorted and condensed to the three boxes – congratulations.  Still go back and reconsider.  Do you really want to keep all that?”

I woke in the morning with the now familiar mantra, “Get rid of it!”

My daughter, Jen, and I had a lunch rendezvous on Saturday.  I love our conversations, and the way Jen examines various aspects of life.  I asked her about all the greeting cards and correspondence.

“Do you ever think you may want to look through the cards, letters and check out various notes written to me or you girls over the years?   During my undergraduate history days, I enjoyed finding old letters and cards and reading how people related to each other through correspondence.”

Jen got a rather perplexed look on her face and immediately, without hesitation exclaimed, “No mom, I know who you are, and I don’t need to look through old cards and letters to learn more.  Let go of the stuff, be free and enjoy your life.”

Our kids did not want our stuff.  The majority of my fifty-something friends are experiencing the same downsizing, simplify our lives movement.  Our children, now young adults, consistently shake their heads at the collection of stuff.  The pieces that perhaps draw attention are family heirlooms, selected items that individually mean something to them, or items that may sell for a decent price.  And we all secretly harbor hope that a piece of furniture, artwork or item we acquired is worth $100,000 or more – if not now, possibly in the future.

That weekend I ventured back to the carefully sorted and packed boxes of cards.  I gave myself a couple hours to read the birthday cards, wedding cards, congratulations on your baby cards, sympathy cards and other correspondence between friends over the past 30 years.  I laughed as I read humorous notes, and later tears took over as I longed for the early days of my marriage, newborns and grieved the death of family and friends.   I held paper proof of my 37 years of living in Idaho.  I cannot go back in time and alter any decisions.  Even if I could, how risky to pull on a thread and unravel a cherished story line.

I found the decision to discard the physical evidence a step out on the ledge of faith that felt both solid and precarious.  That weekend I celebrated and grieved the past.  I acknowledge the rich flow of friends and experiences throughout my life and the life of our family.  During my time in the Treasure Valley, I engaged in community activities and volunteered hundreds of hours to great causes.  I tried to create a better world for my children, all of our children.

I honor and cherish each note and card that a wealth of friends and family took time to send.  20140731_194956However, at the age of 55, I feel the clock ticking and want to spend joyous real-time moments with people and events. In order to continue on a sparkly, vibrant path of trying to give more than I take, all that stuff cannot travel along.  No need to reach for physical evidence, or waste time sorting through stuff.  Time to hold the memories close to my heart and step out in faith.

Amtrak, Ferries and Wild Women of the Pacific Northwest, Part 2

 20140522_112945   Susan, thank you for the wonderful email.  It was a glorious time with everyone….   I loved all our crazy, wacky, peaceful, sleepy, sugar coma, Star Light theater moments and the cool weather.   I miss you all terribly as I am back in hot old Idaho….  I had a great drive to Wenatchee with Pat, excellent conversation, saw gorgeous mountains, a wild river, ate the best ever Indian food, got a terrific tour from Pat and Bill of the charming downtown and panoramic view of the city.  

I logged into my WordPress site and noted I had already started a draft blog chronicling my recent adventures.  The beginning here  is part of an email response I wrote to Port Townsend Susan.  I decided to back up a bit to write more on this trip.–

The Amtrak ride ended too soon, for me anyway as a person who rarely rides the trains. However, from the snippets of conversations on board, Amtrak was a way of travel life for many commuting between Portland, Seattle and beyond.

I got off the train at Edmonds, WA, walked the short route to the ferry and crossed-over to Kingston, where my dear friend Nancy offered curbside service, and off we went to begin the last visiting section of my trip. A reunion with the women of the Pacific Northwest whom I had bonded with on our Habitat build in Kauai.

Thursday morning began with work on a Habitat for Humanity home in Chimicum, Washington.

Nancy is working!

Nancy is working!

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Ann, Kate (and guy in the background) are working!

Well, Nancy, Ann and Kate were productive. I got an attack of the lazy and dabbed slowly away on the exterior side, strolled around the lovely meadow and visited with others. Project Manager Kate noted the lackluster energy and graciously allowed an exit from work to go have fun in Port Townsend.

 

I am wandering, lollygagging around in the meadow  - not working.

I am wandering, lollygagging around in the meadow – not working.

Living in a state that has an abundance of sun and hot weather, I tried to temper my exuberant hope for rainy weather, as I realized I was surrounded by Pacific Northwest dwellers who cherish every ray of sunshine that graces their cloudy, moist world.

I have resided the last 37 years in the desert land of Boise, Idaho, which is a complicated place to live. Idaho is a diverse landscape of deserts, plains, wild rivers, gorges, stunning mountains and four distinct climate seasons. In fact on the plane ride to Portland, my seatmate was a longtime resident of Idaho and we spent the trip discussing the endless list of outdoor places to enjoy in Idaho and I felt a new gratitude for where I live. Yet, it is easy to feel landlocked in Boise particularly during the brutal summer heat. What I luxuriate in each time I flee to Port Townsend, Chimicum, or any location on the Oregon, Washington coast,  is the immediate proximity of the water, the lush greenery and mountain landscape. Eventually I will relocate and settle to the Pacific Northwest.

Meanwhile, back to the Wild Women of the Pacific Northwest HFH reunion.

A mixture of whirlwind activity began as we ate tasty clam chowder, pastries, drank delicious fresh roasted coffee, and strolled through the Saturday market. One of the highlights of the trip occurred when we went to the Rose Theater and watched a movie in the Starlight room. Located in an old building on the top floor, the theater consists of a collection of comfy chairs and couches. Movie time began with the heavy velvet curtains drawn over the windows, and introduced by one of the theater staff.  It was hard to decide which chair to sit in. I started the afternoon sitting with my friends, but halfway through the show, migrated back to a big, fluffy comfy chair. Tables are placed strategically around the furniture for moviegoers to eat dinner and some of the best popcorn this side of the Mississippi.

Wild Pacific Northwest Women (Susan L. is taking the photo)

Wild Pacific Northwest Women (Susan L. is taking the photo)

 

To be continued…..

 

Team Kauai, Fall 2013

photo (21)For this build we are located in a Habitat neighborhood and staying in SAM_2715a house currently retained by the Kauai affiliate for volunteer teams.

Past builds, our teams have stayed in hotels, and in Belfast, Northern Ireland a retreat center.

Renting the house has significantly decreased the cost of the trip, and the team organized to cook 90 percent of our meals.  We bunk 3 to a bedroom, have a comfortable living roomkitchen area, and a porch with a view of the ocean.

Backyard view, mountains on the horizon and coffee plantation located behind the barrier.

Backyard view, mountains on the horizon and coffee plantation located behind the barrier.

I can already tell I am going to miss interacting and being around this group of folks.  What we all have in common is a desire to travel and participate in activity, such as volunteering for Habitat Builds, that works with the community to give something back.

We all have our quirks, routines, distinct personalities, stories, have snippy, tired irritable moments, and yet the cohesiveness of our team is quite remarkable. And I am going to miss each person terribly.

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Our massive shoe collection.

Habitat for Humanity Build in Kauai, Hawaii

Habitat for Humanity Global Village build Guatemala, 2012

Habitat for Humanity Global Village build Guatemala,

I enjoy travel and particularly the final preparatory moments.  On the edge of another adventure  with a Habitat for Humanity two-week build in Kauai, Hawaii.  New territory for me as I have not visited Hawaii, though many of my friends travel quite frequently to the sunny state.

While I pay tedious attention to pack proper clothing for the work site, I often lose track of the details of the build location. The benefit of a team build is I am not the leader. Other wonderful folks made the arrangements for housing, food and scheduled fun time.  The absent-minded behavior will ultimately produced charming moments filled with surprise as I see new territory for the first time.  I pay my money, show up, work and have a fabulous time.

Habitat builds contain layers of encounters as team members are from all over the United States and other countries.  Not only do you meet new people on the team, but further interact with the local community beyond a tourist level helping build homes

I know one member on the team, Nancy, from a previous Global Village Build in Guatemala.   We remained friends and in fact Nancy recruited me to the Kauai build.  In the Guatemala picture, Nancy is located on the far right.

Over the years I learned to travel light and found that I wear less than half the clothing I transport, but that is not the case this trip.  My suitcase contains too many clothes, especially for a sunny environment.

Last weekend I purchased a few cute summer dresses at winter prices – $2.00 each.  Then I scored on a super-duper high-end swim suit designed to hold my fifty something body in place at another terrifically low price.  For those that know me, I am not a shopper and venturing out with me risks a stressful, miserable experience.   To land the few clothing items needed, in addition to  the work clothes, signified another sparkly Habitat trip begins.   So why do I still have a plethora of shirts and pants?  No answers here, simply abandoning myself to the over-packed suitcase phenomena.

And joining me is a travel Deering GoodTime Banjo, packed with bubble wrap in a cushy bag.  Highly recommended by my banjo buddies as a lighter  instrument to take on trips that still maintains a terrific sound.  A conversation with a United Flight staff soothed lingering worries I had about the banjo possibly ending up underneath the plane, assured me it will fit in the overhead and they will assist to find it a safe spot.

Interesting to traveling on October 31, Halloween, – I just spotted superman walking through the terminal.

Guatemala Habitat for Humanity Build, Fall 2010

Guatemala Habitat for Humanity Build